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Phoenix, Arizona

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Shayna Slater
Shayna Slater
Attorney • (215) 735-0773

Summer Infant Monitors Recalled Due to Risk of Strangulation

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The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Summer Infant, Inc. have issued a voluntary recall of some 1.7 million corded infant monitors due to a strangulation hazard. The risk of strangulation occurs when the monitors are placed in close proximity to a child’s crib. Parents are urged to make sure that the cameras are placed more than three feet from the crib and ensure that the cord is not accessible to your infant or toddler.

The CPSC recently received two reports of strangulations resulting in death from these electrical cords. One report involved a 10-month old child whose video monitor was placed on a crib rail and another involved a 6 month old child whose monitor was placed on a changing table that was attached to the crib.

Summer Infant, Inc. has undertaken a campaign to notify parents of the strangulation risk with their corded monitors. If you are in possession of a Summer Infant corded monitor which you purchased between January 2003 and February 2011, you are urged to check the location of the monitor immediately to ensure that your child cannot reach the cord of the monitor. Consumers can contact Summer Infant, Inc. at (800) 426-8627 or visit their website www.summerinfant.com/Home/Product-Recall.aspx to receive an electrical cord warning label and instructions on how you can safely mount your monitor and keep cords out of your child’s reach.

Although this recall only involves Summer Infant monitors, I would strongly urge all parents who use monitors of any type, to check the location of the monitor and cords to make certain that your child is unable to reach either of them. If you use a monitor near your child’s bassinet, pack and play or any other location, please be sure to check those monitors as well to ensure that the cords are not within your child’s reach. This simple action could save a child’s life.